Rayman Jungle Run - Review


Rev.RaymanR


A somewhat simpler, but just as fun adventure in the vein of Rayman Origins, Rayman Jungle Run delivers a perfect mobile experience much akin to its console predecessor. It’s a game that works remarkably well with touch controls, as well as small bursts of gameplay often associated with mobile gaming.




Gameplay

9 / 10




Rayman Jungle Run is an auto-running game that follows much of the same structure as Rayman Origins, albeit in a simpler form. The variety of different moves, and therefore gameplay elements, are introduced slowly. This creates a really great flow that allows the game to start off relatively simple and build towards a more challenging experience, especially for those aiming to collect all the Lums along the way.

You are required to jump at the right moments in order to collect Lums and reach the goal. The game controls Rayman’s running, constantly pushing you towards the end as you participate in the very important task of timing your jumps. As you progress through the game, you are given more abilities (such as gliding) that allow the game to become more challenging and diverse.


Rev_rjr_1
Rayman Jungle Run is the perfect example of a console adaptation on a mobile device.


Rayman Jungle Run forgoes some of the difficulty that was present in Origins, yet still maintains a nice level of challenge. The game also sticks to a certain type of environment, usually based in jungles and sometimes caves or volcanos. The other environmental areas such as deserts, snowy mountains, underwater stages and temples that were featured in Rayman Origins won’t be found in Jungle Run, which seems like a lost opportunity to really impress.

Rayman Jungle Run is the perfect example of how to do a mobile adaptation of a console game. It takes the most memorable, refined and enjoyable elements from Origins and turns it into a pocket-sized game that becomes the ultimate ‘on-the-go’ experience.




Presentation

9 / 10




Rayman Jungle Run looks visually stunning and makes great use of the iPhones retina display, looking even better on the current iPad due to its HD compatibility. Most of the games assets are taken directly from Rayman Origins and reworked into a game that plays perfectly on a mobile phone. The stages are a lot shorter, but definitely don’t lack in terms of their structure and design. Each stage is cleverly crafted, offering you different experiences as you go from stage to stage.

The art style of
Rayman Jungle Run, mixed with the rich imagery creates a visual look that simply pops. From its design, to its playful style and vibrant colours, Rayman Jungle Run is one of the prettiest games on a handheld device right now.


Rev_rjr_2
The Rayman series brings its beautiful visuals to iOS with Rayman Jungle Run.





Music

9 / 10




Rayman Jungle Run’s soundtrack will sound perfectly familiar to those who played Rayman Origins. The game features a beautiful original soundtrack that’s well deserving of a bundle of praise.

At the beginning of a stage, a song from a small selection is chosen by random. Each stage doesn’t have a predetermined track, but rather the game itself has a ‘shuffle effect.’ This works pretty well when you’re stuck on a particular stage, allowing you to keep your sanity as you aren’t forced to hear the same song over and over.

Rayman Jungle Run however has only a small selection of songs. The tracks that are featured in the game are great, truly great, but a few more tunes would have made it just that tiny bit more dynamic.


Rev_rjr_3
Rayman Jungle Run looks phenomenal on the current generation iPad.






Why you should buy this game.

  • A perfect mobile adaption of a console game.
  • Extremely addictive and challenging.
  • One of the prettiest looking games on iOS.

Why you shouldn’t buy this game.
  • Relatively short.
  • Needs more environments.
  • A few more abilities would have been better.


Overall - 9 / 10

The overall score is not necessarily an average
Rayman Jungle Run was released for iOS on September 19 worldwide.


Written by Michael Villalon for ‘The VG Island’.


blog comments powered by Disqus